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Amazon Monkeys

Amazon Rainforest Monkeys

Amazon Rainforest Monkeys are one of the main animals people search for in the rainforest. Perhaps they remind us of our own ancestry and we feel more of a connection to this group. Whatever the reason, the diversity of primates is astonishing and you are sure to find different species if exploring the Amazon with a professional guide. The photos on this page were taken in the Tamshiyacu Tahuayo Reserve of the western Amazon Rainforest. You can visit this area from the Tahuayo Lodge located 150km from the city of Iquitos, north Peru; a contact bubble is in the middle of the page.

Amazon Rainforest Monkeys – Spider Monkey

amazon rainforest monkeys, spider monkey

  • Spider Monkey
  • Large Troups
  • W Amazon
  • Low Risk

Spider monkeys feed on fruits, berries, soft leaves, insects, and honey and live in large territorial groups. The groups split during the day to feed and meet back in the evenings sounding out greeting calls. They live in the western Amazon Rainforest.

Amazon Rainforest Monkeys – Titi Monkey

amazon rainforest monkeys, titi monkey

  • Titi Monkey
  • Many Species
  • Pair Bonds
  • Low Risk

Titi Monkeys have a robust body with short limbs and a hairy non-prehensile tail. Titis feed off grubs, leaves, seeds, and fruit. They seem to prefer trees near bodies of water and form pair bonds.

Amazon Rainforest Monkeys – Tamarin Monkey

amazon rainforest monkeys, tamarin monkey

  • Tamarin Monkey
  • Diverse
  • Live in Groups

Tamarins feed on birds, invertebrates, soft fruit, and plant exudates. They are very diverse in appearance and their names reflect this e.g Saguinus mystax, the moustached tamarin, or Saguinus imperator, the emperor tamarin named after Kaiser Wilhelm II, the last German emperor. Tamarins form troops of 2 to 11 members with frequent migrations and live in tropical forest areas in Central and South America.

  • what lodge amazon rainforest

    Eight Days

    Tahuayo Lodge Iquitos, Peru

    You can visit the highly regarded Tahuayo Lodge & Amazon Research Center as part of this tour of the bio-diverse Tahuayo Reserve. You are assigned a private guide & you can choose an itinerary to reflect your interests. Boasting the most itinerary options in Amazonia, you can whiz through the trees on the canopy zipline, view poison dart frog initiatives, & observe different monkeys on the A.R.C primate research grid.
    Private Guide, Zipline, Primate Research Grid

Amazon Rainforest Monkeys – Squirrel Monkey

amazon rainforest monkeys, squirrel monkey

  • Squirrel Monkey
  • Large Troops
  • Diverse Calls

Squirrel Monkeys live in the forests of South America and feed off fruit and invertebrates. They have diverse calls specific to alarm, courtship, dominance, and pain. Around 26 different calls have been recorded. The best time to see these monkeys is early morning. They sometimes approach visitors out of curiosity and even throw small items onto onlookers. They generally form larger groups than other monkeys of the New World, which consist of 120 – 300 or more individuals in areas of unaltered Amazon rainforest.

Amazon Rainforest Monkeys – Night Monkeys

amazon rainforest monkeys, night monkey

  • Night Monkey
  • Form Pairs
  • Vulnerable

Night Monkeys, or Owl Monkeys, are often seen while night spotting for nocturnal Amazon wildlife. Night monkeys form pair bonds and you will usually see two or more heads poking out from tree holes in the forest. They form close family groups of 4 or 5 family members. There are many species of owl monkey with a lot of disagreement among naturalists regarding taxonomy.

Amazon Rainforest Monkeys – Capuchin Monkeys

amazon rainforest monkeys, capuchin monkey

  • Capuchin Monkey
  • Adaptable
  • Tool Using

Capuchin monkeys eat leaves, fruit, insects, and other small animals. Capuchins are also known to use stones to crack open shelled prey like crabs. They live in troops of around 10 – 40 members in South American forests and are more able to adapt to habitat change than most other monkeys.

Ash - Author & Travel AdvisorAbout the Author: Ash Card has a BSc in Biology, an MSc in Zoology & a love of nature, travel & conservation. In nature, he enjoys the small dramas that are being played out all around us, such as a parasitic wasp hunting its prey while we walk passed unaware.

Photography: Contact Björn Adolfsson

Related Pages
1. Amazon Jungle Tours
2. Best Time To Visit The Amazon
3. Jungle Travel
4. Where to stay in the Amazon Rainforest

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