Amazon Jungle Tours

Rainforest Information |

Rainforest Insects

Insects in the Rainforest

There could be around 10 million insect species on Earth and a great many live in the world’s tropical forests. The most abundant insects in the rainforests are ants, but there’s a considerable diversity of other insects from the smallest wasps commonly called fairy flies (Mymaridae) to the giant rainforest insects like goliath and titan beetles. Beetles account for the highest diversity and include over 370, 000 different species.

African Weaver Ants

African Weaver Ants

  • African Weaver Ants
  • Dominant tropical ant

African weaver ants (Oecophylla longinoda) are a dominant ant species over a large part of tropical Africa. Their common name reflects their weaving behavior. They use their silk-exuding larvae as living glue guns glueing leaves into hollow balls where they nest. Their nests are spread through the trees and they even build small leafy barracks at territory boundaries. Ants first pull foliage together using themselves as living chains, while others holding the larvae move back and forth gluing leaf edges. They are very aggressive ants and fiercely territorial. They farm bugs in the trees for carbohydrates and hunt a diversity of insects that are fed to the larvae. There is another weaver ant species (O. smaragdina) that lives in tropical Australasia and Asia. These insects were possibly one of the first-bio control agents because of their voracious appetite. As mentioned for bullet ants in the Amazon ants article, because weaver ants are highly aggressive, natural selection has shaped a variety of harmless animals to resemble weaver ants for protection.

Amazon Caterpillar

Amazon Caterpillar

  • Amazon Caterpillar
  • Protective crypsis

This caterpillar (species not known) was photographed in the Amazon Rainforest near the Tahuayo Lodge, Iquitos, Peru. As mentioned for weaver ants above, some insects have been shaped to resemble aggressive animals for protection. This species, however, seems to rely on another protection strategy known as crypsis. This is where animals have been shaped by natural selection to resemble coloration etc. of their background (background pattern matching). Taking things a step further, this caterpillar looks as if it resembles changes to leaf color and pattern caused by its own feeding behavior.

  • amazon jungle tours

    Eight Days

    Tahuayo Lodge Iquitos, Peru

    The Tahuayo Lodge is associated with an Amazon Research Center where you can visit an extensive trail network for observing a high diversity of Amazon Jungle monkeys. In fact, the Tahuayo Reserve was founded to protect a rare primate named the Uakari. With your Private guide (as standard), you will take Amazon jungle tours in the Tahuayo and you can choose from the greatest number of itinerary options in Amazonia.

    Private Guide, Zipline, Primate Research Grid

Rhinoceros Beetle

Rhinoceros Beetle

  • Rhinoceros Beetle
  • Most species-rich in Neotropics

Rhinoceros beetles (Dynastinae) are most diverse in the Neo Tropics but have a world wide distribution. The pictured species (Enema pan) is found in tropical Central and South America. Although the beetle can be locally common, little is known about its life history. The species seems to only live in forests and probably feeds on soil hummus. We know that males have larger horns than females and males use these to carry females or to fight. When males carry out these behaviors, they make a mysterious sound and its function and cause is not yet known.

Goliath Beetle

Goliath Beetle

  • Goliath Beetle
  • One of the heaviest beetles

A creature often desired by collectors, goliath beetles are one of the heaviest insects in the world. They are native to western and central Africa feeding on sap and nectar. Despite their weight, they are still capable of competent flight. Unlike most beetles that must clumsily lift their wing cases into the wind exposing their wings, goliaths have special slots and their wings simply slide out.

Flannel Moth Caterpillar

Flannel Moth Caterpillar

  • Flannel Moth Caterpillar
  • Stinging Hairs

This strange looking animal is a flannel moth caterpillar (Megalopyge opercularis) known for its stinging nature. If the spines touch the skin, the caterpillar can cause various symptoms including pain, headaches and vomiting. The species inhabits the southern US down to Central America, although, the above photograph was taking in the Tambopata National Reserve of southern Peru suggesting it extends well beyond its supposed limits. The adults are fluffy yellow moths and quite small with a wingspan of around 4 cm. The caterpillars themselves can vary in color and are covered in yellow, red, grey or mixed hairs called setae.

A caterpillar’s sting should not always be taken lightly. In the late 1800s, an explorer to the Amazon Rainforest by the name of Richard Spruce, known for providing the first detailed information on ayahuasca and for his involvement in malaria medication, wrote an account of his interaction with a stinging caterpillar. He said “I had always made light of caterpillars’ stings until one evening at Tarapoto, in gathering specimens of an Inga tree, I got badly stung on the right wrist … That was the beginning of a time of the most intense suffering I ever endured.”

Heliconius Butterflies

Heliconius Butterflies

  • Heliconius Butterflies
  • Mimicry

These are Heliconius and sulfur butterflies drinking from the eye fluids of a turtle to obtain sodium and other minerals. At least, they appear to be Heliconius butterflies. This butterfly family feeds on toxic plants and absorbs toxins into their own tissues making them bad to eat. Because animals recognize and avoid these butterflies, sometimes edible species mimic their patterns, which has caused a history of butterfly experts confusing different taxa. This discovery was first noted around 100 years ago by Henry Bates, an Amazon explorer, after he watched Heliconius butterflies fly around the forest and the phenomenon is now named Batesian mimicry.

  • tambopata research center, puerto maldonado

    Seven Days:

    Tambopata Research Center Puerto Maldonado, Peru

    One of the Amazon’s most remote lodges, you will share the lodge with researchers investigating one of the largest macaw clay-licks in the rainforest. Hundreds of colorful macaw parrots gather at the lick providing you with fantastic wildlife displays. Monkeys and other wildlife are often visible from the lodge as you relax after exploring five different Amazon habitats and activities from jungle mountain biking and kayaking to aiding in macaw research.

    Remote Location, Macaw Clay Lick

Titan Beetle

Titan Beetle

  • Titan Beetle
  • Giants
  • Mysterious Larvae

True to its name, titan beetles (Titanus giganteus) are indeed titans among insects. No one has ever seen their larvae, which must be even larger than the 16 cm long adults (longer than the other giant on the page, the Hercules beetles). Their jaws are said to be strong enough to snap a pencil in half. These beetles are studied using light traps. This is where artificial lighting is created in their Amazon Rainforest habitat to attract the giants. Collectors often desire this species and the trade provides sustainable income for local communities. The reason it’s sustainable is because the females are elusive and almost impossible to find, so the theory is that collecting males is less damaging to populations.

Barber Bees

Barber Bees

  • Barber Bees
  • Cut Hair
  • Some Species Hurt

Stingless bees (Meliponinae family) are known by various names like barber bees and hair-cutting bees. The bees have a defensive behavior if disturbed and attack. Some species are harmless and simply try and fly into your mouth and ears to make you move, whereas others cut the skin and spray an acrid solution into wounds leading to their other name of fire bees. This is a similar defense to other sting-lacking Hymenopterans (bees, ants and wasps) like the weaver ants mentioned at the top, well known for their painful bite. The ants bite with their jaws pointing their gaster (rear part of the ant) to spray acid into the wound.

The above photo was taken at the Tahuayo Lodge near Iquitos in northern Peru. These are a harmless species of hair cutting bee. If something disturbs their nest when you’re walking through the rainforest, they fly out and cut off pieces of hair like little angry barbers. For more information and photos on rainforest insects, head over to the Amazon ants article or Insects in the Amazon Rainforest.

Ash - Author & Travel AdvisorAbout the Author: Ash Card has a BSc in Biology, an MSc in Zoology & a love of nature, travel & conservation. In nature, he enjoys the small dramas that are being played out all around us, such as a parasitic wasp hunting its prey while we walk passed unaware.

Related Pages
1. Things to do in the Amazon
2. Best Time To Visit The Amazon
3. Jungle Travel
4. Where to stay in the Amazon Rainforest
5. Amazon Birds

Keep updated on latest tours & articles, join our RSS feed, monthly newsletter, or contact us for tour help.

© Thinkjungle.com - TourTheTropics. All rights reserved.